About This Year’s Conference

Capitol Hill Ocean Week 2018

CHOW LOGO 2018
Capitol Hill Ocean Week 2018

What started as a small, daylong gathering in 2001 is now Capitol Hill Ocean Week (CHOW), the nation’s premier annual conference examining current marine, coastal, and Great Lakes policy issues. Convened by the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation every June, CHOW brings together national and global stakeholders to address pressing science, conservation, and management issues facing our ocean and Great Lakes.

This year’s conference takes place over two days and includes high-level plenaries from ocean visionaries and breakout sessions for deeper discussions. Conversations will focus on our changing ocean, restoration of our ocean and Great Lakes, and working together for sustainable waters.

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The Ocean Awards Gala

The Ocean Awards Gala, hosted by the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation in conjunction with CHOW, recognizes champions of marine and Great Lakes stewardship. Past honorees include President Bill Clinton, President George W. Bush, former First Lady Laura Bush, Members of Congress, leading scientists, philanthropists, explorers, and dedicated community volunteers. Guests enjoy a pre-dinner cocktail reception, post-program dessert reception, and a menu featuring sustainable seafood.

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United States Of America Capitol Building
Hill Day

On June 7th, 2018, Capitol Hill Ocean Week (CHOW) provides the opportunity to elevate ocean and Great Lakes policy issues with Members of Congress and their staff with the first-ever CHOW Capitol Hill Day. Capitol Hill Day will give attendees the opportunity to meet with their elected officials to discuss critical policy issues affecting conservation, science, and technology.

CHOW Capitol Hill Day will feature other unique opportunities for attendees to engage with key decision makers, in addition to Hill meetings:

  • A morning coffee panel featuring Congressional staff discussing ocean and Great Lakes legislation; and
  • An evening reception on the Hill to network and connect with Members of Congress, Congressional staff, Administration officials, scientists, business and industry executives, and other ocean leaders.
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Sponsorships

The generosity of our sponsors enables the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation to offer “open source” programming. That brings together hundreds of people from diverse backgrounds to engage in the discussion of critical issues and the formulation of new ideas. Click here for sponsorship information and opportunities.

LEARN MORE

Dive Bars + Eats

Keep the conversation going and visit our favorite sustainable seafood restaurants and bars while you’re in DC for Capitol Hill Ocean Week! Your patronage supports these local businesses and the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation.

Indulge in authentic Greek cuisine and wine at Kellari Taverna. $1 from every drink served in the dining room on June 5, 6, and 7 will support the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation.

Kellari Taverna
1700 K St NW
Washington, DC 20006

Visit Kellari

Event Registration

Ocean Awards Gala
$350 per person
  • Pre-dinner cocktail reception sponsored by McDonald's Corporation
  • Dinner featuring sustainable seafood options
  • Post-program dessert reception
  • Tickets on sale through May 25
BUY TICKETS
CHOW 2018
FREE
  • Access to all conference sessions
  • Snacks and beverages throughout the day
  • Free Wi-Fi in conference areas
  • The opportunity to network with leaders in ocean and Great Lakes conservation
REGISTER NOW
Capitol Hill Day
FREE
  • Breakfast panel featuring Congressional staff
  • The opportunity to engage your elected officials about ocean issues
  • Evening networking reception
  • Register by May 25
RSVP NOW
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Keynote speakers

Meet our most valued speakes

Brian Skerry – Speaker

National Geographic - Photojournalist

Brian Skerry is a photojournalist specializing in marine wildlife and underwater environments. Since 1998 he has been a contr

Asher Jay – Speaker

National Geographic Explorer - Creative Conservationist

Asher Jay is an international adventurer and public figure whose compelling paintings, sculptures, installations, animations,

    Jim Toomey – Speaker

    Sherman's Lagoon - Syndicated Cartoonist

    Jim Toomey is an award-winning ocean conservationist who created the popular comic strip Sherman’s Lagoon, which appears in

    Greg Asner, Ph.D. – Speaker

    Carnegie Institution for Science, Department of Global Ecology - Dr

    Dr. Greg Asner serves on the faculty of the Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science, and in the Depart

      Luiz A. Rocha, Ph.D. – Speaker

      California Academy of Science - Follett Chair of Ichthyology

      Luiz A. Rocha is the Follett Chair of Ichthyology at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco. His major research

      Erinn Muller, Ph.D. – Speaker

      Mote Marine Laboratory - Science Director of the International Center for Coral Reef Research and Restoration

      Dr. Muller received her undergraduate degree in 2003, her Master of Science degree in 2007, and her Ph.D. in 2011 from Florid

      Schedule

      8:30am - 9:30am
      Registration Opens
      9:00am - 9:30 am
      Opening Remarks

      Location: Auditorium

      Visual media can ignite the mind in a way that talk and text don’t, providing opportunity for education, emotional connection, and broader public engagement in marine science and protection. In this session, see  how creative minds are using video, photography, and art to put ocean issues in front of new audiences and inspire conservation and sustainable use.

      Moderator:

      John Tartaglia, Actor-Puppeteer, Splash and Bubbles

      Speakers:

      Mark Brownlow, Series Producer, BBC’s Blue Planet II

      Asher Jay, Creative Conservationist

      Brian Skerry, Photojournalist, National Geographic

      Jim Toomey,  Syndicated Cartoonist, “Sherman’s Lagoon”

      Location: Lobby

      We invite attendees to relax, connect with colleagues, and visit exhibition booths in the lobby. Complimentary snacks and beverages provided for all attendees. Wifi is available throughout conference area and a limited number of charging stations for electronics are available near exhibit booths.

      Location: Auditorium

      Covering less than 1 percent of the ocean, coral reefs support 25 percent of marine life globally to provide an estimated $1 trillion in value to the world economy, including $300 to $400 million annual in value for food and livelihoods from tourism, fisheries, and medicine. Reefs are integral to the livelihoods and well-being of billions of people. But, we risk losing these valuable ecosystems. Nearly 75 percent of the world’s coral reefs are threatened by overfishing, habitat destruction, water pollution, climate change, and ocean acidification. Efforts to conserve and restore coral reefs are lagging far behind their rate of destruction. To preserve this amazing biodiversity, we must protect these valuable ecosystems and develop new conservation solutions and restoration techniques to protect these invaluable ecosystems.

      Moderator:

      Nancy Knowlton, Ph.D., Sant Chair for Marine Science, Smithsonian Institution

      Speakers:

      Greg Asner, Ph.D., Faculty, Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science

      Ruth Gates, Ph.D., Research Professor and Gates Coral Lab Director, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology

      Erinn Muller, Ph.D., Coral Health and Disease Scientist and Program Manager, Mote Marine Laboratory

      Luiz Rocha, Ph.D., Associate Curator and Follett Chair of Ichthyology, California Academy of Sciences

      Location: Hemisphere A

      Sponsored by International Fund for Animal Welfare

      As the ocean and Great Lakes warm, the geographic ranges of species are shifting. In the fishing industry, some fishermen are having difficulty filling their quota as fish shift out of the area, while others are finding an abundance of fish for which they don’t have permits. For whales, seals, dolphins and other marine mammals, changes in ocean conditions and food web dynamics have cascading consequences which in turn present challenges for managers, businesses, and rescue efforts. In this session, we explore the tools available and the gaps that exist to ensure management is adaptive to ecological shifts yet remains sufficiently protective.

      Moderator:

      Stephen E. Roady, Professor, School of Law and Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, Duke University

      Speakers:

      Robert Beal, Executive Director, Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission

      Kristin Kleisner, Ph.D., Senior Scientist, Oceans, Environmental Defense Fund Boston

      Patrice McCarron, Executive Director, Maine Lobstermen’s Association

      Andrew Pershing, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer, Gulf of Maine Research Institute

      Location: Hemisphere B

      Open Innovation? Disruptive Thinking? Hackathons? Artificial Intelligence? You’ve heard the terms but what do they mean for marine and Great Lakes conservation?  Scientists, technologists, resource managers, and businesses are looking for new tools and transformative ideas to accelerate conservation outcomes. In this session, we explore how open innovation tools like mass collaboration, prizes and hackathons are drawing in leaders from across industries to help solve some of the ocean’s toughest challenges, leading to new public-private partnerships for ocean and Great Lakes conservation and management.

      Moderator:

      Sandeep Patel, Open Innovation Director, US Department of Health and Human Services

      Speakers:

      Shaharris Beh, CEO, HackerNest

      Tanya Berger-Wolf, Ph.D., Co-Founder and Director, Wildbook

      Alex Dehgan, Co-Founder, Conservation X Labs

      Andrew Thaler, Ph.D., OpenROV

      Location: Networking and Exhibits in the Lobby

      We invite all registrants to enjoy complimentary food and beverages provided in the Amphitheater lobby area, or feel free to purchase lunch on your own in the Food Court on the Concourse level. Attendees are encouraged to relax, connect with colleagues, and visit exhibition booths. Wifi is available throughout conference area and a limited number of charging stations for electronics are available near exhibit booths.

      Location: Auditorium

      A healthy U.S. economy depends on our ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes resources.  The science and management to conserve and sustainably use these resources is at the heart of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) mission.  Come hear from RDML Timothy Gallaudet about the Administration’s priorities to support our blue economy.

      Keynote:

      RDML Tim Gallaudet, Ph.D., USN Ret., Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and Acting Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere, U.S. Department of Commerce

      Location: Lobby

      We invite attendees to relax, connect with colleagues, and visit exhibition booths in the lobby. Complimentary snacks and beverages provided for all attendees. Wifi is available throughout conference area and a limited number of charging stations for electronics are available near exhibit booths.

      Location: Hemisphere B

      Description: Ecological restoration provides people with the opportunity to both repair damage to the environment and re-establish relationships between nature and culture; it benefits both people and nature. In this panel, learn how ecological restoration projects are engaging communities in practice and developing more inclusive processes.

       

      Location: Hemisphere A

      Coastal communities face ever-increasing risks from sea level rise, floods, and more frequent and severe hurricanes. As these threats interact, they amplify natural disasters, increasing property damage and loss of life. Continuing to bail ourselves out after disaster strikes is not an economically sound strategy and cannot make up for American lives lost. Communities must take action to adapt and reduce risk to create a more resilient nation. This session explores the tools available to help citizens and communities assess and reduce their risk and build a more resilient nation.

      Moderator:

      Russell Callender, Ph.D., Assistant Administrator, National Ocean Service, NOAA

      Speakers:

      Alan Blumberg, Co-Founder, Jupiter Intel

      Chip Cunliffe, Director for Sustainable Development, XL Catlin

      Paula Pagniez, Director of Capital, Science and Policy Practice, Willis Towers Watson

      Elizabeth Wheaton, Environment and Sustainability Director, City of Miami Beach

      Location: Auditorium

      The world needs both wild-capture fisheries and aquaculture as part of a sustainable food supply as the population continues to grow. While the U.S. is a leader in sustainable wild-capture fisheries, U.S. aquaculture development lags behind. Increased offshore aquaculture has the promise of increasing food security in the U.S., growing the American economy, reducing the U.S. seafood trade deficit, and offering fishermen an opportunity to diversify their production for greater financial security. In this session we explore current challenges and potential solutions to sustainable offshore aquaculture, including complexities of business operations, financial investments and risk, technological advancements, and the need for environmental monitoring, sustainability standards, and sound management and policy.

       

      Moderator:

      TJ Tate, CEO and Founder, Seafood.Life

      Speakers:

      Omar Alfi, Co-CEO, Pacifico Aquaculture

      Max Holtzman, Principal, Pontos Aqua Advisory and Vice Chairman, Capitol Peak Asset Management

      8:30am - 9:30am
      Registration Opens
      9:00am - 9:30am
      Opening Remarks

      Location: Auditorium

      Margaret Davidson was an ocean visionary dedicated to fostering early-career leaders and tackling challenging ocean and coastal issues with unwavering determination and innovation. In her honor, CHOW 2018 hosts the next generation  of leaders who are becoming catalysts of change in conservation and business sustainability to share what sparks their creativity, how they engage others to make ideas reality, and where they hope to direct the path of private sector engagement in the future.

      Moderator:

      Adam Lowry, CEO, Ripple and Co-founder, Method

      Speakers:

      Bridget Coughlin, Ph.D., President and CEO, Shedd Aquarium

      Karrie Denniston, Senior Director for Sustainability, Walmart Foundation

      Doug McCauley, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology, University of California Santa Barbara

      Ruth Perry, Ph.D., Marine Scientist and Regulatory Specialist, Shell Exploration and Production Company

      Location: Lobby

      We invite attendees to relax, connect with colleagues, and visit exhibition booths in the lobby. Complimentary snacks and beverages provided for all attendees. Wifi is available throughout conference area and a limited number of charging stations for electronics are available near exhibit booths.

      Location: Auditorium

      The Gulf of Mexico ecosystem is a dynamic, diverse, and ever changing environment. From inland watersheds and rivers to winding coasts to the deep ocean, the health and productivity of the Gulf and its communities depends upon its restoration and its re-engineering. We must understand the connectivity and complexity of the Gulf’s different environments while balancing a diversity of human uses. Additionally, impacts from storms, flooding, and increasingly frequent extreme events play a critical role in the ties between land and sea. It is crucial to address challenges from science, policy, community action, and management perspectives. This is a once in a lifetime opportunity and a time of historic investment for Gulf restoration that, if done strategically and proactively, can rebuild natural coastal barriers, conserve a diversity of habitats throughout the Gulf ecosystem, and underscore the importance of restoration and resiliency for  the health and prosperity of the entire Gulf of Mexico.

      Speakers:

      Alexis Baldera, Director, Gulf Restoration Program, Ocean Conservancy

      Antonio J. Busalacchi, Ph.D., President, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

      Daniel Gotoff, Partner, Lake Research Partners

      Bren Haase, Chief of the Planning and Research Division, Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority

      David Yoskowitz, Ph.D., Associate Director, Harte Research Institute

      Location: Hemisphere A

      Sponsored by the California Academy of Sciences

      The effects of ocean acidification reach throughout the ocean, impacting numerous ecosystems and economies that depend on them. As these impacts radiate through different ecosystems, declines in shellfish and fish threaten fisheries and aquaculture, deteriorated reefs weaken coastal protection, and declining reefs and mammal populations impact tourism. In this session, we explore the lessons learned from states coping with local effects of ocean acidification as we develop better predictions for acidification around the country and as state and federal policymakers draft legislation to mitigate and adapt to ocean acidification.

      Moderator:

      Alexis Valauri-Orton, Ocean Acidification Program Manager, The Ocean Foundation

      Speakers:

      Jan Newton, Ph.D., Director, Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems and Principal Oceanographer with Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington School of Oceanography and School of Marine and Environmental Affairs

      Karina Nielsen Ph.D., Director and Professor Romberg Tiburon Center and Department of Biology, San Francisco State University

      Nichole Price, Ph.D., Senior Research Scientist, Director of Center for Venture Research on Seafood Security, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

      Joseph Salisbury, Ph.D., Associate Research Professor of Oceanography, Ocean Processes Analysis Laboratory, University of New Hampshire

      Brett Veerhusen, Principal, Ocean Strategies

       

      Location: Hemisphere B

      Protected areas are places of special significance and great value to society, ecologically, culturally, and economically. These sites provide a place for people to connect with nature in an ever-developing world, they are homes to rare species and nurseries for commercially and recreationally important fish, they preserve historic and cultural resources, and they support a growing outdoor industry. This session explores the value of these places and the benefits of their protection to American communities and future generations.

      Moderator:

      Tracy Rouleau, President, TBD Economics

      Speakers:

      Will Benson, Captain, World Angling, Inc.

      Matt Liddle, Outdoor Programs and Outreach Mid-Atlantic Manager, REI

      Jim Ritterhoff, Co-Founder, Force Blue

      Tundi Agardy, Ph.D., Executive Director, Sound Seas  

      Location: Networking and Exhibits in the Lobby

      We invite all registrants to enjoy complimentary food and beverages provided in the Amphitheater lobby area, or feel free to purchase lunch on your own in the Food Court on the Concourse level. Attendees are encouraged to relax, connect with colleagues, and visit exhibition booths. Wifi is available throughout conference area and a limited number of charging stations for electronics are available near exhibit booths.

      Location: Auditorium

      With the passage of the Magnuson Stevens Act in 1976, the U.S. took control of fishing in our exclusive economic zone, pushing out foreign vessels and establishing measures to prevent overfishing. In 1996 and 2006, amendments to the Act added requirements for rebuilding and science-based catch limits, establishing the U.S. as a world leader in sustainable fisheries. In this session, industry experts discuss the impact of the Magnuson Stevens Act in restoring American fisheries and supporting a sustainable blue economy.

      Moderator:

      Margaret Spring, Vice President of Conservation and Science and Chief Conservation Officer, Monterey Bay Aquarium

      Speakers:

      Chris Brown, President, Seafood Harvesters of America

      Monica Goldberg, Chief Counsel, Oceans, Environmental Defense Fund

      Greg Jeffers, Director of Purchasing, Gorton’s Inc.

      Steve Murawski, Ph.D., Population Dynamics and Marine Ecosystem Analysis Professor, University of South Florida

      Alan Risenhoover, Director of Sustainable Fisheries, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service

       

      Location: Hemisphere B

      Mangrove forests, tidal salt marshes, and seagrass beds represent a globally relevant carbon stock. The carbon contained in these ecosystems, known as coastal blue carbon, remains stable for as long as the ecosystem remains in tact, but once the system is degraded or destroyed communities lose many ecosystem services and the carbon that took millennia to sequester can be lost to the atmosphere in less than a decade. Understanding how to calculate, report and verify greenhouse gas reductions from coastal ecosystems is critical to developing markets for credits that can provide long-term funding for protection and restoration efforts.  This panel will explore the policy, science and financing frameworks needed to support coastal blue carbon offsets and credits that aid conservation and restoration.

      Moderator:

      Ariana Sutton-Grier, Ph.D., Director of Science, Maryland and Washington DC Chapter, The Nature Conservancy and Visiting Associate Research Professor, University of Maryland College Park

      Speakers:

      Steve Crooks, Ph.D., Principal, Wetlands Science and Coastal Management, Silverstrum Climate Associates

      Jennifer Howard, Ph.D., Marine Climate Change Manager, Conservation International

      Stefanie Simpson, Blue Carbon Program Senior Manager, Restore America’s Estuaries

      Scott Settelmyer,  Managing Director, TerraCarbon

       

      Location: Hemisphere A

      Public-private partnerships and market-based solutions are time-tested tools for supporting environmental protection and land conservation.  What roles can they play in enhancing ocean science, technology, and engagement? in this session, we discuss innovative models for private sector participation in marine and Great Lakes conservation to identify factors that lead to success, challenges to be addressed, and potential for replication and increased conservation outcomes.

      Moderator:

      Monica Medina, Founder and Publisher, Our Daily Planet

      Speakers:

      Sherry Flumerfelt, Executive Director, Monterey Bay Fisheries Trust

      Brett Howell, MBA, PMP, Environmental Markets Entrepreneur

      Julie Lawson, Director, Mayor’s Office of the Clean City

      Location: Lobby

      We invite attendees to relax, connect with colleagues, and visit exhibition booths in the lobby. Complimentary snacks and beverages provided for all attendees. Wifi is available throughout conference area and a limited number of charging stations for electronics are available near exhibit booths.

      Location: Auditorium

      Worldwide, healthy oceans, coasts and freshwater ecosystems are crucial for economic growth, resilient communities, and food production. This underscores the need for both coastal and inland communities to sustainably use and protect these natural resources.  Strong governance and national is necessary to support economic growth while at the same time protecting biodiversity and ensuring the environmental sustainability of ocean, coasts and Great Lakes.  In the U.S. ocean and Great Lakes policies have a long-standing history of strong bipartisan support. Building off CHOW 2017’s informative Congressional Roundtable, CHOW 2018 will bring together current and former Members of Congress for an update on the bipartisan efforts in Congress to meet these dual goals.

       

      Moderator:

      Jessica Leber, Deputy Managing Editor, Oceans Deeply

      Speakers:

      The Honorable Sheldon Whitehouse, U.S. Senate, Rhode Island

      The Honorable Francis Rooney, U.S. House of Representatives, FL-19

      The Honorable Suzanne Bonamici, U.S. House of Representatives, OR-01

      The Honorable Derek Kilmer, U.S. House of Representatives, WA-06 (D)

       

      8:30am-9:30am
      Coffee Panel with Congressional Staff

      Location: Capitol Visitors Center (Room TBD)

      Capitol Hill Day will open with a coffee panel for attendees to hear from Hill staffers about the current state of ocean policy on Capitol Hill. While the topic will be determined closer to CHOW, the coffee serves to educate CHOW attendees before they hit the Hill for meetings throughout the day. The session aims to ensure conversations with Members and staff are productive by providing an overview and update of current events and conversations on the Hill.

      We encourage Hill Day participants to schedule meetings with their U.S. representatives and senators.  Participants are responsible for setting up their own Hill meetings. Please note: the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation is not setting up meetings for participants.

       

      Easy Tips for Setting up a Meeting:

      • Click here to find the name of your U.S. representative or here for senators. You can also reach your US representatives by calling 202-225-3121, and US senators by calling 202-224-3121. Ask the operator to connect you to the individual office.
      • Ask to speak to the aide who handles ocean issues and request a meeting for June 7th. Let them know you are participating in Capitol Hill Ocean Week.  Your call and meeting will be more influential if you speak to the correct aide. However, congressional aides are very busy and this is not always possible. If you cannot speak directly with the aide, leave a message with the receptionist stating that you would like to set up a meeting.  Tell them the topic of the meeting, for example, NOAA funding, fisheries, marine protected areas, etc.
      • Let them know that you are a constituent. Elected officials are most interested in your opinions if you are their constituent, so be sure to say the city and state you are from.

      Tips for Crafting Your Message:

      Click here for an informative video from our friends at COMPASS on how to craft your message for your Hill Day meetings!

      Thank you to our reception co-sponsors, Ocean Caucus Foundation and The Philip Stephenson Foundation

      Location: 106 Dirksen Senate Office Building

      Capitol Hill Day 2018 will culminate with an evening Hill reception. With workshops, meetings, briefings, and hearings throughout what is anticipated to be a busy week and Hill Day, this reception provides a needed opportunity for CHOW attendees to connect with Members and their staff, Administration officials, and other CHOW attendees and speakers, and celebrate a successful week of ocean conservation and policy action!

      World Oceans Day

      On World Oceans Day, people around our blue planet celebrate and honor the ocean, which connects us all. Get together with your family, friends, community, and the planet to start creating a better future. Working together, we can and will protect our shared ocean. Join this growing global celebration on 8 June!

      Find local events near you at worldoceansday.org

      9:30am - 10:30am
      Igniting Ocean Conservation through Media and Art​: Auditorium

      Visual media can ignite the mind in a way that talk and text don’t, providing opportunity for education, emotional connection, and broader public engagement in marine science and conservation. In this session, learn how creative minds are using video, photography, and art to put ocean issues in front of new audiences and inspire conservation and sustainable use.

      Moderator:

      John Tartaglia, Actor-Puppeteer, Splash and Bubbles

      Speakers:

      Mark Brownlow, Series Producer, BBC’s Blue Planet II

      Asher Jay, Creative Conservationist

      Brian Skerry, Photojournalist, National Geographic

      Jim Toomey,  Syndicated Cartoonist, “Sherman’s Lagoon”

      A healthy  U.S. economy depends on our ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes resources.  The science and management to conserve and sustainably use these resources is at the heart of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) mission.  Come hear from RDML Timothy Gallaudet about the Administration’s priorities to support our blue economy.

      Keynote:

      RDML Tim Gallaudet, Ph.D., USN Ret., Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere and Acting Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere, U.S. Department of Commerce

      11:00 am - 12:15pm
      Recovering Coral Reefs: Auditorium

      Covering less than 1 percent of the ocean, coral reefs support 25 percent of marine life globally to provide an estimated $1 trillion in value to the world economy, including $300 to $400 million annual in value for food and livelihoods from tourism, fisheries, and medicine.  Reefs are integral to the livelihoods and well-being of billions of people. But, we risk losing these valuable ecosystems. Nearly 75 percent of the world’s coral reefs are threatened by overfishing, habitat destruction, water pollution, climate change, and ocean acidification.  Efforts to conserve and restore coral reefs are lagging far behind their rate of destruction. To preserve this amazing biodiversity, we must protect these valuable ecosystems and develop new conservation solutions and restoration techniques to protect these invaluable ecosystems.

      Moderator:

      Nancy Knowlton, Ph.D., Sant Chair for Marine Science, Smithsonian Institution

      Speakers:

      Greg Asner, Ph.D., Faculty, Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science

      Ruth Gates, Ph.D., Research Professor and Gates Coral Lab Director, Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology

      Erinn Muller, Ph.D., Coral Health and Disease Scientist and Program Manager, Mote Marine Laboratory

      Luiz Rocha, Ph.D., Associate Curator and Follett Chair of Ichthyology, California Academy of Sciences

      Ecological restoration provides people with the opportunity to both repair damage to the environment and re-establish relationships between nature and culture; it benefits both people and nature. In this panel, learn how ecological restoration projects are engaging communities in practice and developing more inclusive processes.

      11:00am - 12:15pm
      Adaptive Management for Shifting Populations: Hemisphere A

      Sponsored by International Fund for Animal Welfare

      As the ocean and Great Lakes warm, the geographic ranges of species are shifting. In the fishing industry, some fishermen are having difficulty filling their quota as fish shift out of the area, while others are finding an abundance of fish for which they don’t have permits. For whales, seals, dolphins and other marine mammals, changes in ocean conditions and food web dynamics have cascading consequences which in turn present challenges for managers, businesses, and rescue efforts. In this session, we explore the tools available and the gaps that exist to ensure management is adaptive to ecological shifts yet remains sufficiently protective.

      Moderator:

      Stephen E. Roady, Professor, School of Law and Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions, Duke University

      Speakers:

      Robert Beal, Executive Director, Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission

      Kristin Kleisner, Ph.D., Senior Scientist, Oceans, Environmental Defense Fund Boston

      Patrice McCarron, Executive Director, Maine Lobstermen’s Association

      Andrew Pershing, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer, Gulf of Maine Research Institute

      Coastal communities face ever-increasing risks from sea level rise, floods, and more frequent and severe hurricanes. As these threats interact, they amplify natural disasters, increasing property damage and loss of life. Continuing to bail ourselves out after disaster strikes is not an economically sound strategy and cannot make up for American lives lost. Communities must take action to adapt and reduce risk to create a more resilient nation. This session explores the tools available to help citizens and communities assess and reduce their risk and build a more resilient nation.

      Moderator:

      Russell Callender, Ph.D., Assistant Administrator, National Ocean Service, NOAA

      Speakers:

      Alan Blumberg, Co-Founder, Jupiter Intel

      Chip Cunliffe, Director for Sustainable Development, XL Catlin

      Paula Pagniez, Director of Capital, Science and Policy Practice, Willis Towers Watson

      Elizabeth Wheaton, Environment and Sustainability Director, City of Miami Beach

      11:00am - 12:15pm
      Open Innovation to Drive a Sea Change: Hemisphere B

      Open Innovation? Disruptive Thinking? Hackathons? Artificial Intelligence? You’ve heard the terms but what do they mean for marine and Great Lakes conservation?  Scientists, technologists, resource managers, and businesses are looking for new tools and transformative ideas to accelerate conservation outcomes. In this session, we explore how open innovation tools like mass collaboration, prizes and hackathons are drawing in leaders from across industries to help solve some of the ocean’s toughest challenges, leading to new public-private partnerships for ocean and Great Lakes conservation and management.

      Moderator:

      Sandeep Patel, Open Innovation Director, US Department of Health and Human Services

      Speakers:

      Shaharris Beh, CEO, HackerNest

      Tanya Berger-Wolf, Ph.D., Co-Founder and Director, Wildbook

      Alex Dehgan, Co-Founder, Conservation X Labs

      Andrew Thaler, Ph.D., OpenROV

      The world needs both wild-capture fisheries and aquaculture as part of a sustainable food supply as the population continues to grow. While the U.S. is a leader in sustainable wild-capture fisheries, U.S. aquaculture development lags behind. Increased offshore aquaculture has the promise of increasing food security in the U.S., growing the American economy, reducing the U.S. seafood trade deficit, and offering fishermen an opportunity to diversify their production for greater financial security. In this session we explore current challenges and potential solutions to sustainable offshore aquaculture, including complexities of business operations, financial investments and risk, technological advancements, and the need for environmental monitoring, sustainability standards, and sound management and policy.

       

      Moderator:

      TJ Tate, CEO and Founder, Seafood.Life

      Speakers:

      Omar Alfi, Co-CEO, Pacifico Aquaculture

      Max Holtzman, Principal, Pontos Aqua Advisory and Vice Chairman, Capitol Peak Asset Management

      10:30am - 11:00am
      Break for Networking and Exhibits: Lobby

      We encourage attendees to relax, connect with colleagues, and visit exhibition booths in the lobby. Complimentary snacks and beverages provided for all registered attendees. Wifi is available throughout conference area and charging stations for electronics are available near exhibit booths.

       

       

      We invite all registrants to enjoy complimentary food and beverages provided in the Amphitheater lobby area, or feel free to purchase lunch on your own in the Food Court on the Concourse level. Attendees are encouraged to relax, connect with colleagues, and visit exhibition booths. Wifi is available throughout conference area and a limited number of charging stations for electronics are available near exhibit booths.

      We encourage attendees to relax, connect with colleagues, and visit exhibition booths in the lobby. Complimentary snacks and beverages provided for all registered attendees. Wifi is available throughout conference area and charging stations for electronics are available near exhibit booths.

      9:30am - 10:30am
      The Margaret Davidson Emerging Leaders Roundtable: Auditorium

      Margaret Davidson was an ocean visionary dedicated to fostering early-career leaders and tackling challenging ocean and coastal issues with unwavering determination and innovation. In her honor, CHOW 2018 hosts the next generation  of leaders who are becoming catalysts of change in marine and Great lakes sustainability, business, and economics to share what sparks their creativity, how they engage others to make ideas reality, and where they hope to direct the path of private sector engagement in the future.

      Moderator:

      Adam Lowry, CEO, Ripple and Co-founder, Method

      Speakers:

      Bridget Coughlin, Ph.D., President and CEO, Shedd Aquarium

      Karrie Denniston, Senior Director for Sustainability, Walmart Foundation

      Doug McCauley, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology, University of California Santa Barbara

      Ruth Perry, Ph.D., Marine Scientist and Regulatory Specialist, Shell Exploration and Production Company

      Worldwide, healthy oceans, coasts and freshwater ecosystems are crucial for economic growth, resilient communities, and food production. This underscores the need for both coastal and inland communities to sustainably use and protect these natural resources.  Strong governance and national is necessary to support economic growth while at the same time protecting biodiversity and ensuring the environmental sustainability of ocean, coasts and Great Lakes.  In the U.S. ocean and Great Lakes policies have a long-standing history of strong bipartisan support. Building off CHOW 2017’s informative Congressional Roundtable, CHOW 2018 will bring together current and former Members of Congress for an update on the bipartisan efforts in Congress to meet these dual goals.

       

      Moderator:

      Jessica Leber, Deputy Managing Editor, Oceans Deeply

      Speakers:

      The Honorable Sheldon Whitehouse, U.S. Senate, Rhode Island

      The Honorable Francis Rooney, U.S. House of Representatives, FL-19

      The Honorable Suzanne Bonamici, U.S. House of Representatives, OR-01

      The Honorable Derek Kilmer, U.S. House of Representatives, WA-06 (D)

      11:00am - 12:15pm
      Gulf Coast Restoration: Auditorium

      The Gulf of Mexico ecosystem is a dynamic, diverse, and ever changing environment. From inland watersheds and rivers to winding coasts to the deep ocean, the health and productivity of the Gulf and its communities depends upon its restoration and its re-engineering. We must understand the connectivity and complexity of the Gulf’s different environments while balancing a diversity of human uses. Additionally, impacts from storms, flooding, and increasingly frequent extreme events play a critical role in the ties between land and sea. It is crucial to address challenges from science, policy, community action, and management perspectives. This is a once in a lifetime opportunity and a time of historic investment for Gulf restoration that, if done strategically and proactively, can rebuild natural coastal barriers, conserve a diversity of habitats throughout the Gulf ecosystem, and underscore the importance of restoration and resiliency for  the health and prosperity of the entire Gulf of Mexico.

      Speakers:

      Alexis Baldera, Director, Gulf Restoration Program, Ocean Conservancy

      Antonio J. Busalacchi, Ph.D., President, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

      Daniel Gotoff, Partner, Lake Research Partners

      Bren Haase, Chief of the Planning and Research Division, Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority

      David Yoskowitz, Ph.D., Associate Director, Harte Research Institute

      With the passage of the Magnuson Stevens Act in 1976, the U.S. took control of fishing in our exclusive economic zone, pushing out foreign vessels and establishing measures to prevent overfishing. In 1996 and 2006, amendments to the Act added requirements for rebuilding and science-based catch limits, establishing the U.S. as a world leader in sustainable fisheries. In this session, industry experts discuss the impact of the Magnuson Stevens Act in restoring American fisheries and supporting a sustainable blue economy.

      Moderator:

      Margaret Spring, Vice President of Conservation and Science and Chief Conservation Officer, Monterey Bay Aquarium

      Speakers:

      Chris Brown, President, Seafood Harvesters of America

      Monica Goldberg, Chief Counsel, Oceans, Environmental Defense Fund

      Greg Jeffers, Director of Purchasing, Gorton’s Inc.

      Steve Murawski, Ph.D., Population Dynamics and Marine Ecosystem Analysis Professor, University of South Florida

      Alan Risenhoover, Director of Sustainable Fisheries, NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service

      11:00am - 12:15pm
      Predicting, Detecting, and Preparing for Increasing Acidification: Hemisphere A

      Sponsored by the California Academy of Sciences

      The effects of ocean acidification reach throughout the ocean, impacting numerous ecosystems and economies that depend on them. As these impacts radiate through different ecosystems, declines in shellfish and fish threaten fisheries and aquaculture, deteriorated reefs weaken coastal protection, and declining reefs and mammal populations impact tourism. In this session, we explore the lessons learned from states coping with local effects of ocean acidification as we develop better predictions for acidification around the country and as state and federal policymakers draft legislation to mitigate and adapt to ocean acidification.

      Moderator:

      Alexis Valauri-Orton, Ocean Acidification Program Manager, The Ocean Foundation

      Speakers:

      Jan Newton, Ph.D., Director, Northwest Association of Networked Ocean Observing Systems and Principal Oceanographer with Applied Physics Laboratory, University of Washington School of Oceanography and School of Marine and Environmental Affairs

      Karina Nielsen Ph.D., Director and Professor Romberg Tiburon Center and Department of Biology, San Francisco State University

      Nichole Price, Ph.D., Senior Research Scientist, Director of Center for Venture Research on Seafood Security, Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

      Joseph Salisbury, Ph.D., Associate Research Professor of Oceanography, Ocean Processes Analysis Laboratory, University of New Hampshire

      Brett Veerhusen, Principal, Ocean Strategies

      Mangrove forests, tidal salt marshes, and seagrass beds represent a globally relevant carbon stock. The carbon contained in these ecosystems, known as coastal blue carbon, remains stable for as long as the ecosystem remains intact, but once the system is degraded or destroyed communities lose many ecosystem services and the carbon that took millennia to sequester can be lost to the atmosphere in less than a decade. Understanding how to calculate, report and verify greenhouse gas reductions from coastal ecosystems is critical to developing markets for credits that can provide long-term funding for protection and restoration efforts.  This panel will explore the policy, science and financing frameworks needed to support coastal blue carbon offsets and credits that aid conservation and restoration.

      Moderator:

      Ariana Sutton-Grier, Ph.D., Director of Science, Maryland and Washington DC Chapter, The Nature Conservancy and Visiting Associate Research Professor, University of Maryland College Park

      Speakers:

      Steve Crooks, Ph.D., Principal, Wetlands Science and Coastal Management, Silverstrum Climate Associates

      Jennifer Howard, Ph.D., Marine Climate Change Manager, Conservation International

      Stefanie Simpson, Blue Carbon Program Senior Manager, Restore America’s Estuaries

      Scott Settelmyer,  Managing Director, TerraCarbon

      11:00am - 12:15pm
      The Value of Protected Places: Hemisphere B

      Protected areas are places of special significance and great value to society, ecologically, culturally, and economically. These sites provide a place for people to connect with nature in an ever-developing world, they are homes to rare species and nurseries for commercially and recreationally important fish, they preserve historic and cultural resources, and they support a growing outdoor industry. This session explores the value of these places and the benefits of their protection to American communities and future generations.

       

      Moderator:

      Tracy Rouleau, President, TBD Economics

      Speakers:

      Will Benson, Captain, World Angling, Inc.

      Matt Liddle, Outdoor Programs and Outreach Mid-Atlantic Manager, REI

      Jim Ritterhoff, Co-Founder, Force Blue

      Tundi Agardy, Ph.D., Executive Director, Sound Seas  

      Public-private partnerships and market-based solutions are time-tested tools for supporting environmental protection and land conservation.  What roles can they play in enhancing ocean science, technology, and engagement? in this session, we discuss innovative models for private sector participation in marine and Great Lakes conservation to identify factors that lead to success, challenges to be addressed, and potential for replication and increased conservation outcomes.


      Moderator:

      Monica Medina, Founder and Publisher, Our Daily Planet

      Speakers:

      Sherry Flumerfelt, Executive Director, Monterey Bay Fisheries Trust

      Brett Howell, MBA, PMP, Environmental Markets Entrepreneur

      Julie Lawson, Director, Mayor’s Office of the Clean City

      10:30am - 11:00am
      Break for Networking and Exhibits: Lobby

      We encourage attendees to relax, connect with colleagues, and visit exhibition booths in the lobby. Complimentary snacks and beverages provided for all registered attendees. Wifi is available throughout conference area and charging stations for electronics are available near exhibit booths.

      We invite all registrants to enjoy complimentary food and beverages provided in the Amphitheater lobby area, or feel free to purchase lunch on your own in the Food Court on the Concourse level. Attendees are encouraged to relax, connect with colleagues, and visit exhibition booths. Wifi is available throughout conference area and a limited number of charging stations for electronics are available near exhibit booths.

      We encourage attendees to relax, connect with colleagues, and visit exhibition booths in the lobby. Complimentary snacks and beverages provided for all registered attendees. Wifi is available throughout conference area and charging stations for electronics are available near exhibit booths.

      8:30am-9:30am
      Morning Panel with Congressional Staff

      Thank you to our panel sponsor Gorton’s Seafood Inc. 

      Location: 325 Russell Senate Office Building

      Capitol Hill Day will open with a morning panel and continental breakfast for attendees to hear from Hill staffers about the current state of ocean policy on Capitol Hill. While the topic will be determined closer to CHOW, this session serves to educate CHOW attendees before they hit the Hill for meetings throughout the day. The session aims to ensure conversations with Members and staff are productive by providing an overview and update of current events and conversations on the Hill.

      We encourage Hill Day participants to schedule meetings with their U.S. representatives and senators.  Participants are responsible for setting up their own Hill meetings. Please note: the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation is not setting up meetings for participants.

       

      Easy Tips for Setting up a Meeting:

      • Click here to find the name of your U.S. representative or here for senators. You can also reach your US representatives by calling 202-225-3121, and US senators by calling 202-224-3121. Ask the operator to connect you to the individual office.
      • Ask to speak to the aide who handles ocean issues and request a meeting for June 7th. Let them know you are participating in Capitol Hill Ocean Week.  Your call and meeting will be more influential if you speak to the correct aide. However, congressional aides are very busy and this is not always possible. If you cannot speak directly with the aide, leave a message with the receptionist stating that you would like to set up a meeting.  Tell them the topic of the meeting, for example, NOAA funding, fisheries, marine protected areas, etc.
      • Let them know that you are a constituent. Elected officials are most interested in your opinions if you are their constituent, so be sure to say the city and state you are from.

      Tips for Crafting Your Message:

      Click here for an informative video from our friends at COMPASS on how to craft your message for your Hill Day meetings!

       

      Thank you to our reception co-sponsors, Ocean Caucus Foundation and The Philip Stephenson Foundation

      Location: 106 Dirksen Senate Office Building

      Capitol Hill Day 2018 will culminate with an evening Hill reception. With workshops, meetings, briefings, and hearings throughout what is anticipated to be a busy week and Hill Day, this reception provides a needed opportunity for CHOW attendees to connect with Members and their staff, Administration officials, and other CHOW attendees and speakers, and celebrate a successful week of ocean conservation and policy action!

      World Oceans Day

      On World Oceans Day, people around our blue planet celebrate and honor the ocean, which connects us all. Get together with your family, friends, community, and the planet to start creating a better future. Working together, we can and will protect our shared ocean. Join this growing global celebration on 8 June!

      Find local events near you at worldoceansday.org

      Partner Events

      Effects of Climate Change on the World’s Oceans: 4th International Symposium
      10:00 am to 3:00 pm
      BlueTech Expo 2018

      Location: Rayburn House Office Building, Foyer

      Description: Join IOSTIA and Sea Technology Magazine to promote ocean “blue” technology and innovation. The BlueTech Expo will feature an exhibition of ocean innovators demonstrating and discussing their products, services and customer success stories with key decision-makers, members of Congress and their staff. The exhibition will be followed by an innovative B2G networking social.

      Website: bluetechexpo.org

      10:00 am-7:00 pm
      Ocean Plastics Lab

      Location: National Mall

      Description: The Ocean Plastics Lab is an exciting exhibition about science: It showcases the contribution of science to understand and combat the problem of plastics in the ocean. The Lab will travel to various locations worldwide, inviting the public to engage with scientific work being done right now around the world. In the context of current discussions about science in society the Lab demonstrates science’s fundamental role in tackling societal challenges and highlights that society is an integral part of science The Ocean Plastics Lab willbe on display in the nation’s capital in June 2018

      Website: oceanplasticslab.net/en/opl_exhibition_washington.php

      Effects of Climate Change on the World’s Oceans: 4th International Symposium
      10:00 am-7:00 pm
      Ocean Plastics Lab

      Location: National Mall

      Description: The Ocean Plastics Lab is an exciting exhibition about science: It showcases the contribution of science to understand and combat the problem of plastics in the ocean. The Lab will travel to various locations worldwide, inviting the public to engage with scientific work being done right now around the world. In the context of current discussions about science in society the Lab demonstrates science’s fundamental role in tackling societal challenges and highlights that society is an integral part of science The Ocean Plastics Lab willbe on display in the nation’s capital in June 2018

      Website: oceanplasticslab.net/en/opl_exhibition_washington.php

      Effects of Climate Change on the World’s Oceans: 4th International Symposium
      6:00 pm to 9:00 pm
      NOAA Fish Fry

      Location: Department of Commerce, Courtyard

      Description: The NOAA Fish Fry provides an opportunity for 16-20 different seafood chefs and vendors to display their seafood and bring awareness to their local fisheries.  The guest chefs come from locations around the United States from as far as Alaska and Hawaii to as close as the Chesapeake Bay.  Both wild caught and aquaculture raised fish and shellfish are served. Tickets go on sale in early May and are only available through BrownPaperTickets.com.

      10:00 am-7:00 pm
      Ocean Plastics Lab

      Location: National Mall

      Description: The Ocean Plastics Lab is an exciting exhibition about science: It showcases the contribution of science to understand and combat the problem of plastics in the ocean. The Lab will travel to various locations worldwide, inviting the public to engage with scientific work being done right now around the world. In the context of current discussions about science in society the Lab demonstrates science’s fundamental role in tackling societal challenges and highlights that society is an integral part of science The Ocean Plastics Lab willbe on display in the nation’s capital in June 2018

      Website: oceanplasticslab.net/en/opl_exhibition_washington.php

      Effects of Climate Change on the World’s Oceans: 4th International Symposium
      10:00 am-7:00 pm
      Ocean Plastics Lab

      Location: National Mall

      Description: The Ocean Plastics Lab is an exciting exhibition about science: It showcases the contribution of science to understand and combat the problem of plastics in the ocean. The Lab will travel to various locations worldwide, inviting the public to engage with scientific work being done right now around the world. In the context of current discussions about science in society the Lab demonstrates science’s fundamental role in tackling societal challenges and highlights that society is an integral part of science The Ocean Plastics Lab willbe on display in the nation’s capital in June 2018

      Website: oceanplasticslab.net/en/opl_exhibition_washington.php

      Effects of Climate Change on the World’s Oceans: 4th International Symposium
      World Oceans Day

      On World Oceans Day, people around our blue planet celebrate and honor the ocean, which connects us all. Get together with your family, friends, community, and the planet to start creating a better future. Working together, we can and will protect our shared ocean. Join this growing global celebration on 8 June!

      Find local events near you at worldoceansday.org

      10:00 am-7:00 pm
      Ocean Plastics Lab

      Location: National Mall

      Description: The Ocean Plastics Lab is an exciting exhibition about science: It showcases the contribution of science to understand and combat the problem of plastics in the ocean. The Lab will travel to various locations worldwide, inviting the public to engage with scientific work being done right now around the world. In the context of current discussions about science in society the Lab demonstrates science’s fundamental role in tackling societal challenges and highlights that society is an integral part of science The Ocean Plastics Lab willbe on display in the nation’s capital in June 2018

      Website: oceanplasticslab.net/en/opl_exhibition_washington.php

      2pm to 4pm
      Expert is In - Ocean Rocks!

      Location: Smithsonian Museum of Natural History – Sant Ocean Hall

      Description: Travel to the ocean floor to explore underwater volcanoes!  Find out what marine geologists know about ocean rocks and what they can teach us about the Earth. Learn how geologists get rocks up off of the ocean floor. Observe for yourself rocks from 10,000 feet below the waves. Hear tales of wild times at sea!

      All Day
      March for the Ocean

      Location: National Mall

      Description: On June 9, 2018, the March for the Ocean (M4O) campaign will organize mass events including flotillas, marches, and rallies in our nation’s capital and around the country in order to protect our human and wild communities and restore the blue in our red, white and blue.   Blue Frontier Campaign and 70+ partners will mobilize an inclusive and diverse constituency to ensure we have a healthy ocean and clean water for future generations.

      Website: marchfortheocean.org

      10:00 am-7:00 pm
      Ocean Plastics Lab

      Location: National Mall

      Description: The Ocean Plastics Lab is an exciting exhibition about science: It showcases the contribution of science to understand and combat the problem of plastics in the ocean. The Lab will travel to various locations worldwide, inviting the public to engage with scientific work being done right now around the world. In the context of current discussions about science in society the Lab demonstrates science’s fundamental role in tackling societal challenges and highlights that society is an integral part of science The Ocean Plastics Lab willbe on display in the nation’s capital in June 2018

      Website: oceanplasticslab.net/en/opl_exhibition_washington.php

      11am to 4pm
      World Ocean Family Day

      Location: Smithsonian Museum of Natural History

      Description: Explore how we all can keep our ocean plastic-free through activities for all members of your family.  Meet scientists and community leaders to learn about local, positive stories and initiatives that your family can get involved in!

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      Location

      • 1300 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Washington, DC 20004
      • conference@marinesanctuary.org
      • 301.608.3040
      • 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM